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social security

Sixty-two percent of retirees report that Social Security is a major source of retirement income. By contrast, only 35% of workers expect the program to be a major source of income for them in retirement.1

Social Security was never intended to be a retiree’s sole source of retirement income, so lower expectations are realistic and could inspire you to save more in your retirement accounts. But low expectations also reflect concern about the future of the program. Only 10% of workers are “very confident” that Social Security will continue to provide benefits equal to those provided to current retirees.2

Many ideas have been suggested to address Social Security’s fiscal challenges. Here are some commonly cited solutions, with estimates of their impact from the Chief Actuary of the Social Security Administration.3

Eliminate or increase the earnings cap. Workers pay Social Security taxes on income up to an inflation-adjusted cap ($127,200 in 2017). Eliminating the cap in 2017 and later years would address 89% of the Social Security shortfall if benefits were not increased for high earners (72% if benefits were increased). Increasing rather than eliminating the cap would have a significant but smaller effect.

Increase the payroll tax. Workers currently pay 6.2% of earnings (up to the earnings cap) into the Social Security system, with employers matching that amount. Increasing the payroll tax to 7.6% for both workers and employers in 2017 and later years would completely eliminate the shortfall.

Raise the full retirement age. The current age to claim full Social Security retirement benefits is 66 for individuals born between 1943 and 1954; full retirement age increases gradually to 67 for those born in 1960 and later. Raising the full retirement age to 69 by 2034, with small increases thereafter, would eliminate 40% of the funding shortfall.

Sources
1–2) Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2016
3) Social Security Administration, 2016

Retirement Planning Adds To Social Security Benefits

You can become anxious when you have to deal with your retirement planning alone. So, let me help you figure out how much Social Security you can expect. Moreover, I can advise you on how to create a retirement where you don’t have to only rely on Social Security.
Let’s meet for a FREE retirement strategy consultation at my office.
Call (866) 471-7233.

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